Madeira, black and white

the first thing I recall from Madeira is color. Bursting, wild, overwhelming palette of shades, embraced by the sharp, Atlantic light, hitting my eyes on every occasion.

maybe that’s why I like the photographs of Madeira in black and white the most. jungle tamed. organised chaos. big, vast, the most authentic mix of colors, black and white x-rays the island and leaves only what’s essential.

I miss laying my eyes on the far away, vast landscape. Madeira is a big pillow.

 

water of Madeira

In the sixteenth century the Portuguese started building levadas to carry water to the agricultural regions. The most recent were made in the 1940s. Madeira is very mountainous, and building the levadas was often difficult. Many are cut into the sides of mountains, and it was also necessary to dig 25 miles (40 km) of tunnels.

Levada comes from the portuguese word levar which means to carry. It carries the rain and the aggressive Atlantic storms from one side of the island to another, from the forests to farmer’s fields in the remote foggy mountains. While the whole idea of civilisation in the heights of Madeira is pretty shocking, the advancement of their water system shows some extreme determination. Paul said these people really wanted to settle here.

The land of Madeira is quite an impressive one too. Sharp, soaring mountains are covered with jungle and farms, levadas filled with fresh water, forming almost mathematically straight lines in the wild, distant landscape.

I tried to document the special relation of Madeira and the water. I got a strong impression, that people from Madeira have a special, conscious relation with its water, unlike most of the Western civilisations. There’s over two thousand levadas on the island, and beside their primary function as a water providers, they found another one, as paths, jogging tracks, everyday commute ways to school, fields, or work. Built by prisoners in the early times, the extremely hard and risky job, the water system has become something way more than what it was primarily created for; it’s a part of the island’s culture.

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levada dos Torres, Noguera

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levada dos Torres, the water tank

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levada do Norte

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levada dos Torres, Camacha

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levada do Norte

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western fields

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western fields

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western fields

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western fields

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Camara dos Lobos

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Cabo Girao

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the ocean

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we sat on the shore and watched the ocean.

Paul said “look” and the big wave came and than another and another.

as the ocean retreated the hundreds of stones rolled down. what a lovely sound.

I don’t know how many hours passed, but I don’t think the time was going minute by minute. It went a little bit here and a little bit there. tick tock, tick tock, like that.

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summer in britain

summer came to London, and it makes me sweat. Everybody has jumped out of their clothes and they now wear hardly anything, white limbs observing the world for the first time this year. Ridiculous amounts of half naked people have stormed to the parks and covered the grass with their half naked bodiesI’m lying there too, wearing my sunglasses and unfortunate jeans, looking at the summery vibes through my funky lens, this is London I’ve never seen, London everybody speaks about. I like this one quite a bit.

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